Black and Gold Bows

I think these black buttons with little gold bows are as pretty as a button! The buttons are French antique ones that I found at Rollo in Kyoto and they're the perfect size and shape for earrings. The buttons actually separate into two parts - the black plastic button has a small hole in the centre so that the brass bow can slot neatly into it and sit flush on the surface. It's a really simple and elegant design! 

To turn these buttons into earrings, I threaded some gold coloured wire into the hooks on the back of the buttons and made some loops on both ends with a pair of round nosed pliers. Then I added the earring hooks and some sparkly bean-shaped gold chain. I love this chain because of the way it catches the light and sparkles. These earrings are super light so I often forget that I'm wearing them at all! 

Love - PMQ - Hong Kong

Last month, I visited Hong Kong for the first time. We were only there for three days but we had a wonderful time exploring the city and eating way too many dim sum! One of my favourite places was the PMQ centre. The complex is located at the junction of Aberdeen Street and Hollywood Road in central. Walking up the steep hill on Aberdeen street, its not until you arrive at the entrance that you notice the buildings, tucked away amongst the city high rises. It gives the feeling of entering an oasis of calm, away from the busyness of the city that surrounds it on all sides.

PMQ in Central, Hong Kong

The PMQ site has an unusual history. From 1889, it was a public school, the first in Hong Kong. After World Ward 2, the site was rebuilt to house the Police Marriage Quarters, hence the name PMQ. Then in 2010 it was reopened as a creative centre.

The complex is made up of two seven storey buildings that are joined by a garden/walkway in the centre. Its jam packed with a variety of design and fashion stores and studios from both local and international designers, as well as a few cafes and pop up stores.

One of my favourite shops that I visited at PMQ was Coney & Co. They sell unique handmade jewellery with a vintage feel. While I was there, I bought a delicate pair of flower earrings with coral coloured beads. I love their simple and elegant design and I've got quite a few compliments when I've worn them. They're very light and comfortable to wear and came in a cute mint-coloured felt jewellery bag. The store itself has a lovely cosy atmosphere. It felt a bit like being transported in time to a 19th century house with the jewellery displayed in antique cabinets. I definitely want to come back to this store!

Another shop I really loved was Blck Sheep Empire. I bought two pairs of super cute shoes there. Having a slight obsession with pandas (actually kind of a big obsession..), I had no choice but to get these panda shoes! They're really fun to wear and a little bit whimsical too. I also bought a red and mint-green pair with floral print. They're actually covered in upholstery fabric which I think works really well as a shoe covering. I like the little gold metallic detail on the heels too!

The shoes I bought from Blck Sheep Empire

While I was there, I had a nice time chatting to the designers and creators of the brand, Jen Webb and her partner Jac C. Jen is from Australia and studied graphic design like me. I think it takes a lot of skill, passion and determination to run your own business so I find it really inspiring to see young designers like Jen and Jac C getting their work out into the world. It makes wearing these shoes all the more special!

[Shop] Taylors Buttons - London

Last summer and again this month, I visited the most incredible shop in London called Taylors Buttons. I'm in awe of the range of antique and one of a kind buttons that you can find in this Aladdin's cave of a store! The buttons here are made of a wide variety of materials from plastic, glass, metal, ceramic, crystal and leather, just to name a few! 

Inside the shop, the shelves are stacked from floor to ceiling with box upon box of buttons, so the hardest thing is choosing which ones to buy!! Also, many of the buttons are quite old and not made anymore so it's a good chance to pick up some limited edition pieces!

The history of the shop itself is as interesting as the buttons it holds. Charles Dickens lived in the building twice during his life - you can see the distinctive blue plaque on the wall outside. It's also just down the road from what was once the Cleveland Street Workhouse, the same one which possibly inspired Dickens when writing Oliver Twist.

It was a real pleasure to meet the owner and proprietor of the store, Maureen Rose and to chat with her while I was there. She told me that her shop is over a 100 years old and that she and her late husband, Leon Rose, took over the business about 50 years ago.

Mrs Rose has made and supplied buttons for film, television and theatre as well as for fashion designers so her work has appeared in many performances on the screen and stage. She told me one of the best parts about this kind of work was the variety of people that come into her store - from someone trying to replace a missing button to others wanting something special like some hand covered buttons for a period TV drama.

Mrs Rose has been really helpful each time I've visited. She's always able to able to pick out something new and unique for me. I spent a very happy couple of hours pouring over buttons in their old boxes and I found a few hidden jems that I hope to make into some jewellery pieces! I particularly like these shell buttons (below) that were custom dyed in vibrant rainbow colours. A customer recently used some of the small purple ones on a waistcoat for his wedding day.

She also showed me these "goldfish" buttons (below left) - so called for their golden colour. They're made from abalone shell and have a lovely opal finish. I also picked up some unusual belt buckles (below right) that I might make into a brooch or a necklace. I love their organic lines!

The glass buttons in the shop are some of the most interesting ones I've seen! I chose some with a gun metal finish that really catch the light (below left). I also fell in love with these cone shaped ones (below right). I think they look a little like ornate parasols. The level of detail is amazing!

Then there are the purple and green glass leaf buttons (below left) that I think look a little art nouveau in style. I like their insect like iridescence. I was also drawn to these black, gold and silver buttons (below right) made from a variety of materials like metal, crystal and plastic. I wondering what kind of jewellery to make them into...

Many of the buttons in the store are very good value, costing around 50 pence a button. Even some of rare antique buttons like these red, green and blue crystal ones (below) with hand set stones are only a few pounds each.

Lunch from Le Pain Quotidian

Coming into Taylors Buttons, I felt at home. Its a relaxed and welcoming place - a lovely shop to spend an hour or two. While I was there, quite a few customers and friends stopped by for some button advice and a friendly chat with Mrs Rose. I get the sense that it's an important part of the local community. 

Also, it's only about a 5 minute walk from the British Museum so you can do a bit of site seeing nearby. And there are plenty of cafes in the surrounding streets where you can grab a bite to eat and have a well earned button break! 

Don't come here if you have a button phobia - as Mrs Rose told me, it's an actual phobia! As for me, I'll be sure to be back again soon! 

Jet Black Necklace

Jet button necklace with carved facets

I've been posting a lot of earrings recently so I thought it was about time for a necklace! I bought these jet buttons when I was in London last summer. Their faceted surfaces are really bold and striking and add another dimension to these otherwise simple buttons. I love the way they catch and reflect the light around them.

Jet is a type of fossilised driftwood that has been formed over a long period of time after being trapped and compressed in mud. So jet is actually quite fragile and rare these days but it is easy to carve and has a brilliant lustre that it retains over time. It's also light and warm to the touch which makes it a lovely material for jewellery.

Here's a bit of background about jet jewellery. It became popular as mourning jewellery during the Victorian era when the trend was began by the Queen herself after the death of her husband, Prince Albert in 1861. Queen Victoria's grief was so great that she continued to wear only black jewellery, buttons and clothes until her death in 1901. 

To make this necklace, I threaded some gold coloured wire through the two buttons, closing them with loops on both ends. Then I added a geometric gold chain necklace and a small chain tassel to the base button. 

Whilst this necklace was made as a fun piece of jewellery, I can't help imagining where these antique buttons came from and who might have worn them. The untold stories of buttons like these ones continues to intrigue me. Like little windows into the past, they offer only partial glimpses of what might have been and leave me wondering...

Moon and Stars

My first thought when I saw these pretty blue buttons was that they'd make a great pair of earrings! They remind me of the night sky filled with stars and a crescent moon. The buttons are antiques that I found at Ecrin in Kyoto. I'm not sure how they were made them but I love the design! They look to be moulded plastic with a circular window cut out that's been filled with a pearly blue background and a sprinkling of silver leaf.  I also love how each button is a little different from the other with more or less 'stars'. 

The backs of the buttons have neat little holes cut into them. I made them into earrings by threading some sterling silver wire through the holes and closing the ends with a little loop. After that, I added some sterling silver earring hooks and some sparkly chain that hangs down in slightly different lengths. These are definately the right earrings for star gazing!

[Shop] Ecrin - Kyoto

Ecrin in Kyoto

I found Ecrin by chance one day when we were walking around Kyoto. The shop is just around the road from one of our favourite restaurants, a little French place called Le Bouchon. We go there sometimes for lunch or dinner. It's has a really cute and cosy interior and it feels like a little piece of Paris in Kyoto.

Ecrin is a truly amazing shop! Its just a few minutes walk from Kyoto Shiyakushomae subway station. It stocks a huge range of antique buttons from all over Europe. The buttons are neatly stacked in boxes from floor to ceiling so you could easily spend a hour or so checking out the buttons! I spoke briefly with the shop owner who told me that he takes trips to various parts of Europe to source the buttons directly. (Unfortunately, my Japanese isn't great so I could only understand some of what he told me - must study harder!!!)

Some of the buttons and parts I bought

I picked up some unusual antique buttons while I was there. My favourite piece is a dragonfly button (or 'tonbo'  トンボ in Japanese). The button is made of glass that's been treated on the front with a kind of iridescent paint or enamel. It shines gold/green/blue depending on which way you look at it. It's quite unusual but the finish makes it look like a real dragonfly! I haven't decided what kind of jewellery it'll become - maybe a necklace or a brooch.

As well as selling a wide range of buttons in all shapes and sizes, the shop also stocks lace braids and other accessory parts like rings. I found some cute little plastic buttons with crystals inset in them. I also picked up some silver sequins that could work in another button piece and a pair of pretty blue plastic buttons with silver leaf detail that I think look a bit like moons and stars.

This shop is a little special in that they also have some really exquisite antique glass and crystal pieces like belt buckles. They were so shiny and sparkly that I wanted to buy them all! I guess I'll just have to visit again soon!

Here's a link to their Ecrin's blog (in Japanese) and a map showing where the shop is.

Feather Button Brooch

Buttons and feathers go together!

I've been wanting to make some jewellery with feathers for a while! I bought these feathers a long time ago so its good to finally use them in a piece. I'm not quite sure why but I think buttons and feathers go together - maybe its because buttons are hard whilst weathers are soft and floaty. Either way, I love the way in which feathers are delicate and strong at the same time. Its amazing that something as fragile as a feather can allow a bird to fly.

P1030167.jpg

In the Feather Button Brooch, I wanted to show the beautiful lines and patterns in the feathers. I chose these two antique buttons to match the burgundy and olive green feathers. The pearly green button came from a lovely little button shop in Kyoto called Ecrin. (I'll be posting about this shop very soon!) The smaller purple button came from the Rollo store in Kyoto. I like the wispy, feather like detail on the top. I think it might have been made by using some kind of marbling technique when the button was being formed.

I made the brooch by cutting some brass tubing and sliding it through the hook at the back of the button and then gluing it in place. After that, I attached a gold brooch back that I bought from Tokyu Hands, one of my favourite crafty shops in Japan. Then I glued the purple button to the front if the piece. I'm trying out a new glue at the moment called Super XG Gold. I've had a bit of trouble finding a glue that bonds plastic and metal parts together permanently so I'm still testing this one out! The last thing I did was thread the two feathers through the tubing until I had a shape I was happy with. The finished brooch is very light to wear and a little bit whimsical!

How about you? Do you own any feathery jewellery?

Golden Week Earrings

Blue and gold antique buttons

This week was Golden Week here in Japan so it felt like the right time to make some colourful new earrings and enjoy the spring weather! Golden Week is just about the longest vacation period in Japan - there are four public holidays that fall within the same week so lots of people take some time off work, go travelling and enjoy the good weather.

I bought these blue and gold buttons at Rollo in Kobe last week. They're antiques from Holland and I love the turquoise/gold colour combination and the simple geometric design. The buttons are made of two parts that slot neatly together. The back piece is a gold plated metal disc with a hole cut out of the centre. The front part is made of moulded plastic and slots neatly into the hole in the metal piece. 

These earring were pretty easy and fun to make. All I needed was some gold plated brass wire which I threaded into the hooks at the back of the buttons. Then, using my pliers, I twisted the wire at the ends to secure them to the buttons. After that, I made some hand formed earring hooks to match. 

A Little Slice of Rainbow

Rainbow button

When I was a kid, my sister and I had a book called 'The Last Slice of Rainbow' by Joan Aiken. I really loved this book - not just for it's beautiful stories but also because the illustrations were amazing! I remember being fascinated by rainbows as a kid. I even used to try catching them on my bedroom wall using a crystal vase! But of course, no matter how hard I tried, I never could. Catching rainbows, like trying to hold onto a moment in time is impossible. And it's probably just as well because it's a rainbow's very illusiveness that makes them all the more beautiful.

I love these oversized buttons! They're so bright and cheerful! I bought them from j4 beads in Kyoto. The shop is just around the corner from Rollo and they stock a wide range of inexpensive accessory parts, beads and a few buttons too. 

These buttons are made from two layers of acrylic with a pice of metallic cloth sandwiched in-between. The base colour of the cloth is red with the rainbow colours woven into it so the buttons shine a bit like reflectors when they catch the light. Even though the buttons are new, I think the material gives them a bit of a retro feel.

To make the Rainbow Earrings, I chose a fan shape I liked and cut the button using a jewellers saw. Then I filed and sanded the edges using some wet and dry sandpaper. Once they were nice and smooth, I used a little Tamiya polishing compound to make them shine. Because the button holes were the perfect size for jump rings, I didn't need to glue on any parts to attach the earring hooks. I'd like to try cutting out more intricate shapes next time but the simple fan shape was good start.

These earrings are fun to wear and are a little reminder of the child in me who still tries to catch rainbows sometimes.

White Doves

These White Doves have become one of my favourite pairs of everyday earrings. The buttons are French antique from Rollo in Kobe. They're actually the same kind of buttons as I used in the Starlight Necklace only slightly smaller.

These buttons are great because they're so versatile. They make a good base to which I can add different parts to create a variety of accessories. The buttons come in a range of colours but so far, I've bought the hot pink, bright blue and lime green ones. I'd like to make a necklace using all three colours clustered together like pieces of candy.

For these earrings, I paired the pink buttons with some mother of pearl doves. The doves, also from Rollo, are new from Asia and are double sided so that I can have the birds facing each other. I like the symmetry and it looks to me like they're hanging out together! The doves look like they're been hand carved because they're all a slightly different shape. They even have tiny jet black eyes inset into the mother of pearl! I bought some rabbits and flowers too.

The earrings were very easy to make - I glued the doves to the buttons and then added some metal earring hook plates to the back. And voila!  These earrings are like little pops of colour that add some brightness to my day whenever I wear them.

Rollo - Kobe

Some of the buttons and goodies I bought from Rollo in Kobe

Rollo in Kobe

When I get the chance, I really love going on a day trip to Kobe. It takes about an hour and a half to get there by train from Nara (on the Kintetsu line) but you can stay on the same train for the whole journey. Kobe is a really beautiful city that sometimes gets overlooked by the more famous Kyoto and Osaka. It's actually a port town surrounded by the sea on one side and mountains on the other. The town centre, near Sannomiya Station is a busy place full of shops and department stores. There are some really long glass covered shopping arcades in this area so you could easily spend the entire day just shopping if you wanted to. I think the city has a relaxed vibe with a bit of an international feel to it too. 

There also happens to be a Rollo store in Kobe which is a big plus for me! The store is a little bit bigger than the one in Kyoto but they sell a similar range of antique and new buttons as well as jewellery parts and accessories. The shop is about a 10 minute walk from Sannomiya Station and is in one of the quieter backstreets. They have a giant button hanging outside the store! Here's a photo and a map.

Just around the corner from Rollo is RolloStock, a store that specialises in fabric, ribbon and all sorts of textile goodies. There's also some interesting shops and boutiques nearby selling clothes, accessories and home wares so it's quite fun to explore the area around the shop too. Here's a map showing where the stores are in relation to each other.

 

Brocantetit. Just around the corner from Rollo. 

The last time I was in Kobe, I also visited one of Rollo's related stores called Brocantetit. It's a little different in style to Rollo selling a variety of antique and vintage goods for the home as well as paper goods, some buttons and sewing items. I found these gorgeous moving type letters there. In the past, they would have been used in a printing press. (You can still see some ink stuck the W!) They're actually quite heavy to hold because they're made of steel. I'd love to make them into some kind of jewellery in the future so I'll have to put my thinking cap on! I also bought these small metal buttons with stamped lace detail. I think they'd make a cute pair of earrings or cuff links. What do you think?

For me, no trip to Kobe is complete without visiting one of the city's many cake shops! I really like the patisserie a la campagne. They have two stores around the corner from each other (here and here). We usually have to line up for a table, but the cake is definitely worth the wait!!!

Afternoon Tea Earrings

Dear 52 Buttoners,

Sorry for my absence these past three weeks. I've been on holiday in the UK and I wasn't able to post from over there. Sometimes technology gets the better of me! Anway, now that I'm back in Japan I have some exciting new button adventures that I hope to share with you in the coming weeks. Thanks so much for reading!

Meg  :)

These sweet little rose buttons are antiques from Holland. I found them at Rollo and I really love their simple design and feminine colour. The buttons are made of mother of pearl and have been finished in a shiny coat of lacquer. The rose pattern looks like it's been printed and transferred onto the button somehow. Do you know what technique they might have used to do this? I'd be really interested to know!

To make the earrings, I added some metal plates to the back of the buttons. Then I hung some Swarovski crystals beneath each button in two colours - fuchsia and rose. I think the colours of the crystals really complement the roses.

I bought the crystals and earring hooks from Parts Club in Osaka. They have a few shops in Japan but I usually visit the one on Shinsaibashi suji. They sell a pretty wide range of crystals in all shapes, sizes and colours which is good for me because lately, I've become a bit obsessed with these oval (rondelle) crystals. I like how they catch the light and sparkle when you move! Here's another piece I made using these crystals (without buttons this time!) They make a really soft tinkling noise when you wear them.

There's something a little romantic and old fashioned about roses so I think they make the perfect accessory for afternoon tea - especially if you're eating scones! Luckily, I had a few opportunities to do this while I was in England and Wales. One of my good friends in London baked us fresh scones with handmade jam and whipped cream - yum! I also really enjoyed trying Devonshire cream tea which includes a pot of black tea served with milk and a scone covered with clotted cream and strawberry jam. Not so healthy but oh so good! As a little side note, I think in a Cornish cream tea, the layer of jam is spread on first followed by the cream. I can't decide which way is better! What do you think?

I would also have liked to have had high tea but sadly I didn't get the chance to this time so here's a photo I took a couple of years ago of high tea at the Langham Hotel in London. It was as delicious as it looks!

What do you think the perfect accessory for high tea is?

Black & White Butterflies

These earrings combine two of my favourite things - buttons and pearls! I felt inspired to make them after seeing a great exhibition last year called  Pearls - Jewels from the Sea at the Hyogo Prefectural Museum of Art in Kobe. On display was an amazing variety of pearl jewellery and objects from all over the world - from tiaras worn by Queens to Marilyn Monroe's pearl strand necklace. It seems that pearls continue to be a timeless symbol of elegance.

The exhibition explored the history of pearls in various cultures spanning a period of about 2000 years. It examined the historical, cultural and scientific background of the pearl trade and later cultivation. Japan too, has a long association with pearls with Kobe being one of the key places where they are exported. I also learnt about a Japanese scientist and entrepreneur, Kokichi Mikimoto who pioneered a technique to culture perfectly spherical pearls in 1893. 

I love that natural pearls are created by a happy accident - when a tiny particle gets trapped inside an oyster and becomes the beginnings of a new pearl. It was suprising to learn that natural pearls are actually quite rare and that each and every one is unique.  Seeing the range of pearls on display at the exhibition (of pretty much any colour you could imagine) was really eye opening!  

Seeing the exhibition really got me thinking about using more pearls in the jewellery I make. Quite often, by using a pearl, you can add another layer to a piece of jewellery. So when I saw theses little butterfly buttons on a recent trip to Rollo,  I thought they'd look good paired with some pearls! I think they're perfect size for everyday drop earrings and even though they're small, they stand out when you wear them. Sometimes (at least when it comes to earrings) simple is best!

The buttons are new from Asia and are made of plastic in three layers - white, black and white. I think the design has been created by either cutting or etching away the butterfly shape from the top white layer so that the black shows through. I like how the design of the button is both simple and detailed. The contrasting black and white creates a stamp like effect.  The pearls were originally from a bracelet that I took apart so are living a new life now as earrings!

To make the earrings, I glued two metals plates to the back of each button so that I could hang the earring hooks from one side and pearls from the other. I'd like to try making another pair with black pearls next time!

What kind of pearls do you like?

Starlight Necklace

I made this necklace after a trip to Okinawa last summer. Wearing it always reminds me of the fun times I spent there. Of hanging out at the beach with good friends, the sand and the sea. The colours in this piece have a summery feel that makes me think of the beach at sunset and that first lone star that you glimpse at twilight, shinning brightly like a jewel in the sky.

The sea in Okinawa is incredibly blue and changes colour throughout the day like a chameleon. In the early morning, it's full of soft blues and pinks. During the day, it transforms into a gradient of aquamarine and cerulean that contrasts with the white sand. Then, as the sun sets, the water changes again into a mysterious mix of indigo, orange and purple.

I bought the parts for this necklace at Rollo in Kobe. (I'll be posting about this shop and my trip to Kobe soon!) The button is French antique and made of plastic that's been painted blue. I love it's colour and glossy finish! The gold star, which I glued to the button, is stamped in what I think is brass. The red-orange glass bead has subtle swirls of colour inside the bead that you can only see when you hold it up to the light. To connect the pieces, I attached two metal plates to the back of the blue button so I could hang the bead from one side and attach a gold chain to the other. And somehow, the contrasting colours in this necklace actually complement each other.

Do you have any summer jewellery that reminds you of a faraway place or a happy holiday? I'd love to hear from you!

& Stripe

The buttons I bought

 & Stripe

Living in Nara, I don't get many chances to go to Tokyo. But the last time I did, I was lucky enough to find this beautiful button shop! & Stripe is in Nakameguro, just a short train ride away from the centre of the city. It's one of my favourite areas in Tokyo, with it's winding streets that are dotted with quirky little shops and boutiques. They're definitely worth a look if you like handmade or vintage goods. I love wandering around here and discovering little things that make me smile like the cute wrought iron birds you can see on the bridges that span the river. The first time I went shopping here back in 2007, I bought my very first pair of bird earrings! It marked the beginning of what has become a happy obsession of mine!

& Stripe is in a lovely quiet street that runs along the river. You could easily spend an hour or so browsing among the thousands of buttons they have on display. There's also a few cafes nearby so if you're shopping with someone who's not a button enthusiast, they can go and get a coffee while you shop! Stacked in glass jars like an old fashioned sweet shop, the buttons look a lot like lollies so visiting this store made me feel a little like a kid in a candy shop! They also stock a variety of vintage and new buttons as well as jewellery making parts. So next time I'm in Tokyo, I definitely want to visit & Stripe again!

Do you know any crafty jewellery / button shops in Tokyo? I'd love to hear from you!

Wrought iron birds on a bridge in Nakameguro

Cute flower boxes and a pinwheel that caught my eye

 

Sakura and ginko leaf manhole cover

 

The Blue Key

Square link details on the silver chain

When I was a kid, I learnt to play the piano. I wasn't a very good student because I didn't practice enough. But I did like to open the piano lid sometimes to look inside. I thought there was something really beautiful about the way the keys were nestled next to each other. It seemed kind of magical that a bunch of keys and wires, held together at just the right tension, could create all those different notes and sounds.

So I've called this necklace The Blue Key because it reminds me of piano keys sitting side by side, waiting to be played. I love the shape and 3D chunkiness of the button. It also feels lovely to hold! 

I think the button might be made of some kind of plastic like melamine. It looks like it could have been carved by hand and then finished with a glossy cerulean blue paint. I also love the small white details left on the edges of the button because they really enhance it's geometric shape.

The button is French antique from Rollo and I think it's one of those perfect pieces that doesn't need anything added or taken away to make it into jewellery. The pendant was very easy to make. I simply I glued a metal plate onto the back of the button so that it would hang diagonally. Then, I added some silver squares along the length of the silver chain so that when you wear the necklace, they catch the light and reflect the shape of the button.

I think this button would also make a lovely ring too! What do you think?

Jelly Ring

This button really reminds me of jelly! I found it at Rollo and was immediately drawn to it's shape, colour and lightness. The button is acrylic with a soft pink colour. It has flecks of gold painted on the back that catch the light and make it glow!

Recently, I've been watching Downton Abbey and I think this jelly button looks a little like something they might have served for dessert! In Edwardian times, jelly was a dish for special occasions, sometimes made to be the centrepiece of the table. Jellies were made in a variety of bright colours and moulded into intricate forms using copper moulds. After I made this ring, I started looking at some pictures of the antique moulds used to make these kind of jellies. The design and shape of the moulds are beautiful and quite detailed.

However special jelly was then, today it's kind of an ordinary dessert. But most of all, it reminds me of being a kid - a birthday party treat we used to eat with ice cream! I also remember it being just about the only good thing about getting sick - being allowed to each a lot of jelly as you got better again!

Sadly this ring doesn't wobble like the real thing but its a lot of fun to wear all the same! I made it by saw piercing a brass disc and then gluing it to the base of the button. After that, I glued the ring onto the brass disc. I think this button works really well as a ring because you can enjoy looking at it from different angles. 

Do you remember making jelly as a kid? If you're an Aussie like me, it was probably Aeroplane Jelly! What was your favourite flavour?

Happy Cats!!!

I found these colourful cat buttons at Rollo. They looked so happy and cheerful that I had to buy them! The buttons are antique and are made of plastic coated in paint with a matte finish. The black details are etched into the buttons. I like the way this makes them stand out from the colour. The simple design reminds me of cartoon cats!

So far, I've made the red ones into a pair of earrings but I think they might make a cute ring or a pair of cufflinks. What do you think?

The earrings were very easy to make. First, I cut off the plastic loops on the back of the buttons and sanded them down. After that, I glued on some small metal plates with rings at the top to hang the earring hooks from.

I get lots of comments whenever I wear these earrings so they always manage to brighten up my day! After all, who doesn't love a happy cat?! Now if only I could find some Grumpy Cat buttons too!...

 

Silver Ferns

Silver fern earrings

I love mixing it up when it comes to the materials I use in my jewellery pieces. I found these French antique cream buttons with inset rhinestones at Rollo on one of my visits there. I love the design of these buttons - so simple and eye-catching. But it took me a while to decide what I wanted to make with them! It was only when I was looking through some fabric pieces I had at home, that I saw how good the buttons looked with these silver ferns.

I was suprised to find that the ferns are actually 24ct gold thread mixed with white. I bought them at Kawachi Artists' Materials in Osaka. The shop is on the 8th floor of the Tokyu Hands building in Shinsaibashi. I love both of these shops because you can find almost any arty or crafty thing you might need there!

I think the fabric pieces are usually used as appliqués on clothing but I thought they'd work well in jewellery pieces because they're so light and delicate. Lately, when I've been shopping in Japan, I've noticed some accessories (usually necklaces) with elements of fabric and lace worked into them so I though I'd try it for myself.

I connected the buttons with the ferns by wrapping some fine artist's wire around the ends to make loops for the jump rings. When you wear the earrings, the ferns look a little like wings that flutter and catch the light as you move. So there's something old and something new in these earrings. I guess I'll have to keep searching for something borrowed and blue!

Do you own any jewellery with a fabric element?

Black and Gold Rose

The necklace

The two buttons that make up this pendant fit together so well, it's almost like they were made for each other! They're both French antique but despite their difference in style, they really complement each other. The base, gold button is acrylic with (what looks like) a piece of metallic fabric pressed inside. This gives the button a subtle weave and shine that catches the light beautifully. The black and gold rose button is also acrylic with a matte black finish. The gold details looks like some foil has been applied to the surface by hand as they're all a little different. Their shininess contrasts nicely with the matte black of the button.

In order to stack the buttons on top of each other, I filed away the rounded base of the flower until it was flat and then glued them together. The rose rests neatly in a small depression in the gold button. After that, I added a tear shaped black bead and some cream coloured pearls to the pendant. I finished the piece by hanging it from a double strand of sparkly gold chain.

Close up of the rose buttons

I really like the possibilities of combining different buttons to make an entirely unique piece! Sometimes, like this pendant, the buttons really complement each other. At other times, their differences brings about something completely unexpected.